PUMA pitcrew builds Ferrari F1 out of clothes, generates buzz

29 09 2009

This is nothing if not impressive:

GBH worked with the PUMA retail team at their Carnaby street store to make a Ferrari F1 car using nothing more than PUMA Motorsports clothing, caps, shoes and bags.

the-car-1

A brilliant idea well executed, capturing the interconnection between the brands and the motorsport.

And from the buzz online, it looks like this story played well right across the automotive, lifestyle, fashion, and design titles.

115,000+ views of the YouTube video so far. File this one under inspiration. Hat tipped.

Link:

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Sometimes, a story just sells itself

27 09 2009

Watch this.

Now, this could have been a post examining journalistic integrity in the United States, or the absurdity of ultra-competitive local news there. Or it could have delved into the 24 hour news cycle with its constant need for content and on air ‘filler.’

But it’s not.

Instead it’s a chance to reflect on the following:

That some lucky member of the Hooters PR team (possibly a young AE, hopefully male) gets up in the morning, goes to work, and gets to pitch the ‘Infamous Hooter Girl Rodeo Barstool Trick.’

God bless America.

The best bit? This stunt pushing a wings night that happens every Tuesday… for kids.





A day of Facebookery

7 09 2009

facebookI’ve been skilling up my Facebook Fan Page prowess today and thought I would share a few things before shutting down for the day.

First off is the Facebook Fan Page directory which can be found here. As you might expect, you can break down the list of Fan Pages by type of page (e.g. products, TV shows, celebrities, etc.) as well as search them by keyword.

Old news? Yes.

But I often fiddle and search until I find what I’m looking for on Facebook so it’s good to remember that Fan Pages can all be found in one handy place. A treasure trove of case studies for you PR/social media/advertising types (see below).

When you arrive at the page you are greeted by the most popular fan page by number of fans. Top 10?

  1. Michael Jackson – 10,207,298 fans
  2. Barack Obama – 6,689,609 supporters
  3. Vin Diesel – 6,146,520 fans
  4. Facebook – 5,022,715 fans
  5. R.I.P Michael Jackson (We Miss You) – 4,667,851 fans
  6. Pizza – 4,582,169 fan
  7. Will Smith – 4,428,324 fans
  8. I need a vacation!!! – 4,385,516 fans
  9. Dr. House – 4,372,902 fans
  10. Mafia Wars – 3,990,218 fans

Vin DieselI get Obama and the double Michael Jackson entry. I even get Will Smith and that loveable curmudgeon Dr. House. But Vin Diesel? At number 3?

I thought I was Rickrolled.  So I did a quick search and it’s for real:

I no longer have any connection to this world.

Brands

To maintain my sanity, I thought I would close by providing a more interesting list of the top 15 official brand Fan Pages (by # of fans):

  1. Facebook – 5,023,105 fans
  2. Starbucks Coffee Company – 3,827,219 fans
  3. Coca-Cola – 3,677,849 fans
  4. YouTube – 3,582,388 fans
  5. Nutella – 3,297,349 fans
  6. Pringles – 2,784,376 fans
  7. kinder surprise – 2,616,879 fans
  8. Live Messenger – 2,493,152 fans
  9. Ferrero Rocher – 2,409,724 fans
  10. adidas Originals – 2,063,395 fans
  11. Victoria’s Secret – 2,026,758 fans
  12. iTunes – 1,849,655 fans
  13. Disney – 1,835,206 fans
  14. Nike Shoes – 1,592,793 fans
  15. Toblerone – 1,511,744 fans

I intend on spending some time over the coming days getting acquainted with some of these in greater detail. I’ll be looking to get a handle on the types of content that can be found on the pages, how they are organised, the frequency with which they are updated, and the degree of community interaction (if any?).  Do check back for updates.

Callan Green from Bailey Gardiner, a San Diego-based agency, wrote guest post on Mashable back in June covering 5 ‘killer’ Facebook Fan Pages and included Pringles (6), Coca Cola (3), Starbucks, Adidas (10) and Red Bull. That is definitely worth checking out.

Useful Facebook Links:

Face Book Blogs:





‘Bing… The better way to Google’

11 08 2009

logo-bingThere was quite a bit of buzz a few months ago when Microsoft re-branded their ‘Live’ search to ‘Bing’. Bing, as you probably know, was Microsoft’s attempt at making a search ‘verb’ to rival Google. TechRadar asked:

Will you, as Microsoft wishes, ‘verb up’ and use the word ‘Bing’ to denote searching for something on the internet, much as we have all got used to using Google as a verb?

A few months on, I think the answer is still a resounding no.

I haven’t heard anyone say they ‘Binged something’, nor have I been asked to ‘Bing something’ for someone.

Which is why when I came across this video, I couldn’t help but laugh.

Like writing with a Biro, wiping your nose with a Kleenex or Hoovering the house, you Google something.

I think the video sums up succinctly the futility of Microsoft trying to gain ground on Google by attempting to become part of ‘everyday speech’ / an ‘everyday expression.’

It’s a valiant attempt, but in the end a losing battle for any brand to try and fight (even if that brand is Microsoft).

On the day Bing launched, an acronym made its rounds on the internet that got a lot of laughs.

Bing: but it’s not Goggle.

That won’t get old.

Useful links:





The social web’s most engaged brands

20 07 2009

Interesting report out today about which big brands are doing the ‘best job’ online across a number of social media channels. The study was conducted by analyst Charlene Li of the Altimeter Group and Wetpaint, and ‘ranks the top 100 brands by ‘social media engagement’. The social media channels in question include blogs, Facebook, Twitter, wikis, and discussion forums.

Amazingly, the study claims a correlation between social media engagement and revenue growth. Working in social media marketing/PR, this is music to my ears. But I’m inclined to agree with TechCrunch’s Erick Schonfeld:

I really doubt that their level of social media engagement had anything to do with their revenue growth, it is just that the strongest brands are the most engaged.

That said, this study was conducted by former Forrester Analyst Li (Groundswell anyone?) so I wouldn’t count the findings out completely.

So who comes out on top?

  1. Starbucks (127)
  2. Dell (123)
  3. eBay (115)
  4. Google (105)
  5. Microsoft (103)
  6. Thomson Reuters (101)
  7. Nike (100)
  8. Amazon (88)
  9. SAP (86)
  10. Tie – Yahoo!/Intel (85)

I love lists, but I love case studies even more and the report contains some best practices from Starbucks, Dell, SAP and Toyota. Its definitely worth a skim.

For me, the report highlights the need to keep my finger on the pulse of what other brands are doing online – and learning from it. When I come across a decent case study online I tend to file it on my Delicious profile under a ‘casestudy’ tab for future reference.

Some notable case studies include US electronics retailer Best Buy and soft drink giant Coca Cola, by Robin Grant from We Are Social. Michael Litman from Consolidated also did a smashing job a few months ago with his Mashable post about the Compare the Meerkat campaign. Beyond that, here are a few others that caught my eye recently:

Am I missing any?

[Full report – ENGAGEMENT: Most Engaged Brands On Social Media]

[Photo and article via TechCrunch]