Twitter Spam

20 08 2009

Off to a bad start this morning.

I opened my inbox to find a deluge (by my standards) of new followers on Twitter and instead of thinking “Mr. Popular” I thought “the spambots must be hard at work.”

And they were.

Of the new additions, were 12 13 almost identical profiles and each was using Twitter in an inexplicable manner to push what I can only presume is some porn.

And here they are.

twitter a new low

Take it all in, because I fear this mosaic is a metaphor for where Twitter is headed.

Kudos to the spammers though, for at least choosing some ‘authentic sounding’ porn star names like Lauri Maddox and Billie Glover.

At least some thought went into that.





‘Bing… The better way to Google’

11 08 2009

logo-bingThere was quite a bit of buzz a few months ago when Microsoft re-branded their ‘Live’ search to ‘Bing’. Bing, as you probably know, was Microsoft’s attempt at making a search ‘verb’ to rival Google. TechRadar asked:

Will you, as Microsoft wishes, ‘verb up’ and use the word ‘Bing’ to denote searching for something on the internet, much as we have all got used to using Google as a verb?

A few months on, I think the answer is still a resounding no.

I haven’t heard anyone say they ‘Binged something’, nor have I been asked to ‘Bing something’ for someone.

Which is why when I came across this video, I couldn’t help but laugh.

Like writing with a Biro, wiping your nose with a Kleenex or Hoovering the house, you Google something.

I think the video sums up succinctly the futility of Microsoft trying to gain ground on Google by attempting to become part of ‘everyday speech’ / an ‘everyday expression.’

It’s a valiant attempt, but in the end a losing battle for any brand to try and fight (even if that brand is Microsoft).

On the day Bing launched, an acronym made its rounds on the internet that got a lot of laughs.

Bing: but it’s not Goggle.

That won’t get old.

Useful links:





Event: Measurement Camp London

8 08 2009

Measurement Camp

On Thursday 6 August I popped along to another installment of Measurement Camp, hosted at We Are Social’s swank offices and facilitated by Will McInness.

measurement camp

Measurement Camp

There was a really great turnout, though not quite the 96 people who signed up on the events page. As ever, it was a diverse bunch with representation from Media, Ad, Digital, Social Media and PR agencies, as well as a few clients.

Beth Granter from the Good Agency took the stage again to share a campaign case study that she recently completely for the RSPCA. It needs to be said that she stepped up and pulled the presentation deck together only the day before, so her ‘hardcore measurement camper’ status is well deserved.

This particular campaign was all about getting people to sign an online petition in response to the Government’s public consultation on the welfare of racing greyhounds. They used a combination of blogger outreach, forum discussions, Twitter and Facebook ads to make that happen. The campaign looked pretty well thought out from its inception, and social media measurement wasn’t an afterthought, but rather it was built into the execution from the very beginning. Nice one.

This is what I took away:

  • Facebook ads drove the most traffic – Facebook ads appeared to drive the most traffic to the petition by a healthy margin, no doubt due to the precise targeting and segmentation that can be achieved. I haven’t dabbled with Facebook ads much myself, but am increasingly curious as to how they might be employed as part of a PR-led online/social media campaign. (Or is that just cheating?)
  • Twitter/blog/forum users were more engaged – Beth presented a slide showing the source of web traffic to the RSPCA site, and the approximate length of time each user group spent on the site. It seems that people who came to the petition via Twitter/forums/blogs spent the longest time on the site. I found this fascinating and I think you could persuasively conclude a few things:
    1. The audience who either chose to ‘follow’ the campaign on Twitter or read about it on a forum/blog they frequent, are likely to be the most interested in the subject matter and therefore engaged in the campaign.
    2. I think it’s also reasonable to assume that they were also the most likely to fill in the petition, hence all the time that was spent on the petition page of the website

So, to crudely summarise the online behaviour from the tactics above, Facebook ads will give you quantity, but social media ‘content’ will deliver quality engagement.

The Facebook ads seemed to be successful at providing a short burst of high volume activity (visits to the website), but this interaction may have been fleeting (less likely to fill in petition). By contrast, the Twitter/blog/forum audience was smaller, but probably the ‘right’ one and took the time to complete the task at hand.

Very cool indeed.

All in all, it was a good session as evidenced by some of the #measurementcamp comments flowing on Twitter during and after the event.

At the closing of the session Will unveiled to everyone the newly completed measurement camp brand and logo (above) to be licensed under creative commons ‘so you can bosh it on stuff’.  A move so simple and smart, it begs the question ‘why didn’t we do that earlier’?

I look forward to the next one.

Other links: